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Protecting Whistleblowers since 1977

The Whistleblogger

Successful use of FOIA in the International Program at the Government Accountability Project

Bea Edwards, July 01, 2016

“For every breaking story and revelation made possible by the FOIA, countless others are undoubtedly buried as the law’s effectiveness sags under the weight of processing backlogs resulting from, among other things, a lack of resources and reliance on outdated technology, as well as inconsistent application in terms of disclosure and overbroad use of exemptions.

FOIA Responses Echo Urgent Whistleblower Warnings in BP Gulf Disaster Investigation

Shanna Devine, July 01, 2016

“For every breaking story and revelation made possible by the FOIA, countless others are undoubtedly buried as the law’s effectiveness sags under the weight of processing backlogs resulting from, among other things, a lack of resources and reliance on outdated technology, as well as inconsistent application in terms of disclosure and overbroad use of exemptions.

Advocacy Groups Call on Armed Services Committees to Preserve Military Whistleblower Rights

Irvin McCullough, June 27, 2016

After both chambers of Congress passed their versions of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for FY 2017, twenty-eight public interest organizations and advocacy groups sent a letter to leadership of the Senate and House Armed Services Committees and encouraged them to maintain the integrity of the military whistleblower provisions in the bill through conference.

House Whistleblower Caucus Member Leads Passage of OSC Reauthorization Bill

Irvin McCullough, June 22, 2016

On June 21st, the United States House of Representatives unanimously passed the “Thoroughly Investigating Retaliation Against Whistleblowers Act” (H.R. 4639).

GAP Joins Coalition to Oppose Changing “Rule 41” to Safeguard Americans’ Privacy Rights

Staff, June 21, 2016

Thanks to whistleblowers such as Edward Snowden, we know about illegal government surveillance. Now the U.S. government wants to use an obscure procedure—amending a federal rule known as Rule 41— to radically expand their authority to hack. The changes to Rule 41 would make it easier for them to break into our computers, take data, and engage in remote surveillance.

These changes could impact any person using a computer with Internet access anywhere in the world. However, they will disproportionately impact people using privacy-protective technologies, including Tor and VPNs.

The Insider Threat Program: Determined to Avoid Accountability

Matt Fuller, June 20, 2016

Foreword

In the aftermath of classified disclosures to Wikileaks, the Obama administration created an Insider Threat Program tasked with identifying the “malicious insiders.” In practice, however, we have found that the Insider Threat Program is really a threat to insiders who commit the truth – whistleblowers.

New whistleblower protection law in France not yet fit for purpose

Anja Osterhaus - Transparency International, June 20, 2016

Check out the full story via Transparency International here!

GAP Welcomes Keith Henderson as 2016 Carvalho Fellow

Staff, June 17, 2016

The Government Accountability Project is pleased to announce that it has selected Keith Henderson as its 2016 Carvalho Fellow. The fellowship is generously funded each year by GAP Board member Getulio P. Carvalho. In this capacity, Professor Henderson will focus his research on the strengths and weaknesses of whistleblower protections at international organizations, and subsequently recommend the most promising avenues for reforms.

Senate Intelligence Committee Reaffirms Need for NRO Whistleblower Protections

Irvin McCullough, June 09, 2016

The National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) may receive its first congressionally approved Inspector General (IG).

Resignation of UN Whistleblower ‘Appears to Be a Damning Indictment’ of Failed Zero-Tolerance Policy

Bea Edwards, June 08, 2016

This week, Anders Kompass, the Director of the Field Operations and Technical Cooperation Division of the Officer of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, announced his resignation. Kompass reported the sexual exploitation and abuse of children by peacekeepers in the Central African Republic and rather than commending him, the High Commissioner ordered him investigated last year for leaking information. 

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